Corticosteroid ointment for dermatitis

Long term use of topical corticosteroids can induce tachyphylaxis (tolerance to the vasoconstrictive action of topical corticosteroids). Adverse effects are uncommon when using mild to potent corticosteroids for less than three months, except when used on the face and neck, in intertriginous areas (skin folds), or under occlusion. However, very potent corticosteroids should not be used continuously for longer than three weeks. 2 If longer use of very potent corticosteroids is required, they should be gradually tapered to avoid rebound symptoms and then stopped for a period of at least one week after which treatment can be resumed. 2

Distribution : Following intravenous administration of 1 mg of fluticasone propionate in healthy volunteers, the initial disposition phase for fluticasone propionate was rapid and consistent with its high lipid solubility and tissue binding. The apparent volume of distribution averaged L/kg (range, - L/kg). The percentage of fluticasone propionate bound to human plasma proteins averaged 91%. Fluticasone propionate is weakly and reversibly bound to erythrocytes. Fluticasone propionate is not significantly bound to human transcortin.

Topical antibiotics, particularly neomycin sulfate, may cause cutaneous sensitization. A precise incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (primarily skin rash) due to topical antibiotics is not known. The manifestations of sensitization to topical antibiotics are usually itching, reddening, and edema of the conjunctiva and eyelid. A sensitization reaction may manifest simply as a failure to heal. During long-term use of topical antibiotic products, periodic examination for such signs is advisable, and the patient should be told to discontinue the product if they are observed. Symptoms usually subside quickly on withdrawing the medication. Applications of products containing these ingredients should be avoided for the patient thereafter (see PRECAUTIONS : General ).

The safety and efficacy of DIPROLENE Ointment for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, have been evaluated in three randomized active-controlled trials, two in psoriasis and one in atopic dermatitis . A total of 378 subjects, of whom 152 received DIPROLENE Ointment, were included in these trials. These trials evaluated DIPROLENE Ointment applied twice daily, for 14 days. DIPROLENE Ointment was shown to be effective in relieving signs and symptoms of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

Corticosteroid ointment for dermatitis

corticosteroid ointment for dermatitis

The safety and efficacy of DIPROLENE Ointment for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, have been evaluated in three randomized active-controlled trials, two in psoriasis and one in atopic dermatitis . A total of 378 subjects, of whom 152 received DIPROLENE Ointment, were included in these trials. These trials evaluated DIPROLENE Ointment applied twice daily, for 14 days. DIPROLENE Ointment was shown to be effective in relieving signs and symptoms of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

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